ROSA International Women’s Day Protest

International Women’s Day Protest – 6pm at the Spire, Friday 8 March Stand up for women’s right to choose Stop violence against women Rage against rape Oppose austerity & the assault on the public sector

International Women’s Day Protest – 6pm at the Spire, Friday 8 March

  • Stand up for women’s right to choose
  • Stop violence against women
  • Rage against rape
  • Oppose austerity & the assault on the public sector

Speakers include Maureen Sullivan, a survivor of the Magdalene Laundries; Sinead Redmond, pro-choice campaigner; Becci Heagney from the UK campaign, Rape is no Joke; a speaker from the National Women’s Council and Ruth Coppinger, Socialist Party Councillor.

ROSA (for Reproductive rights, against Oppression, Sexism & Austerity) has been initiated by women in the Socialist Party, with the aim of promoting and organising events, actions and campaigning activity on the issues mentioned, open to anyone who supports its message to participate in. It’s named after Rosa Parks, the inspirational black campaigner who famously refused to give up her seat for a white passenger, sparking the Montgomery bus boycott of the Civil Rights Movement. And also after Rosa Luxemburg, exceptionaland leading socialist theoretician and activist of the early 20th century, killed for her revolutionary politics in 1919. If you wish to get involved with ROSA, Text ROSA & your name to 087 6956968 or email: rosawomen2013@gmail.com

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