Why I joined

I have recently joined the Socialist Party. I am a self employed wall and floor tiler and like many in the construction industry, I am finding things very difficult at the moment.

I have recently joined the Socialist Party. I am a self employed wall and floor tiler and like many in the construction industry, I am finding things very difficult at the moment.

Traditionally I would have been a Labour voter, but not really politically motivated. Since the downturn in the economy I started to take more of an interest in politics, and what I saw really disturbed me. The complete capitulation of the Labour Party to the capitalist markets and the blatant greed of career politicians who no longer represent the working class of this country.

A friend of mine who had been a Socialist Party member for many years invited me along to a branch meeting in Cork and it was obvious to me that the members there were very capable and conscientious about their politics.

Added to that I had observed people, like Joe Higgins, Clare Daly, Paul Murphy, and their absolute integrity and self sacrifice, in the fight for the working class and under privileged in Ireland today.

After only a few short months I feel that I am making a difference and contributing to the cause of ridding us of this rotten system. Before joining I was totally frustrated at the antics of our elected representatives but since I got involved I find that I have a clear focus about what needs to be done, and my faith in my fellow workers has been restored.

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