“Why I joined the Socialist Party”

When I had finished college in 2008, I had hoped to get into a job but because of the disastrous state of the Irish economy at that time, this was never going to happen. So like many others I ended up joining the dole queue for a while.

When I had finished college in 2008, I had hoped to get into a job but because of the disastrous state of the Irish economy at that time, this was never going to happen. So like many others I ended up joining the dole queue for a while.

During this time one could only look on in disgust as the government proceeded to make a bad situation even worse. I always had a brief understanding of what socialism meant, and further research on the subject led me to the conclusion that our current capitalist system would punish the ordinary people for mistakes it made.

I came across a notice for the Socialism 2010 event in April this year and attended it. I found the Socialist Party’s policies and ideas reflected many of my thoughts and feeling on our society.

They struck me as professional, very well organised and definitely meant business to try and bring serious change to the way our country is run, that is in a way which is fair and benefits every person equally and not just a small few elite. That is why I decided to join the join the struggle and join the Socialist Party.

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