No to forced transfer of Mosney Asylum Seekers

“Today, having visited and spoken to the applicants for asylum in Mosney, I am appealing to the Minister for Justice Dermot TD to see that there is no compulsory relocation to other centres”.

“Today, having visited and spoken to the applicants for asylum in Mosney, I am appealing to the Minister for Justice Dermot TD to see that there is no compulsory relocation to other centres”. “Very many of the people who recently received letters telling them to prepare themselves to  move to Dublin in a few days, have been in Monsey for several years. They have built up friendships and support systems both within the Mosney centre and with local organisations and people. Having only €19.10 spending money allocated to them each week, a transfer, even to Dublin, would represent a very real sundering of these relationships that are vital to them.

“I believe that the Minister of Justice should see to it that compulsory relocation must not occur. It is also critical that the very long waiting period for determination of their cases which often amount to many years should be dramatically reduced in the interests of humanitarian concern. To have endured the various types of repression in their countries of origin and then be left waiting with the threat of repatriation hanging over them which in some cases would have fatal consequences is intolerable.”

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